US National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change
A detailed overview of the consequences of climate change and mechanisms for adaptation, published in 2000


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Updated 12 October, 2003

US National Assessment
of the Potential Consequences
of Climate Variability and Change
Regions & Mega-Regions

 

 Regions

Alaska
Appalachians
California
Eastern Midwest
Great Lakes
Great Plains (Central)
Great Plains (Northern)
Great Plains (Southern) / 
Rio Grande
Gulf Coast
Metro East Coast
Mid-Atlantic
Native Peoples / Native Homelands
New England
Pacific Islands
Pacific Northwest
Rocky Mountain / Great Basin
South Atlantic Coast and Caribbean
Southeast
Southwest
 

Mega Regions


 

Student Reading Book
See also our National Assessment Educational Resources.

The US National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change divided the country into regions (listed to the left), each with its own Assessment Group.  In most cases, the Assessment Groups organized "regional scoping workshops" and generated reports for each region (see workshops page for additional information on the workshops).

A separate "Synthesis Team" consolidated many of these regions to form larger "mega-regions" (listed above) around which its Overview and Foundation reports are organized.  In most cases, if you want information on a particular area of the country, you should start with the Mega-Regions.  Note that 2 of the regions (Alaska and Pacific Northwest) are not consolidated with other regions and are considered stand-alone mega-regions in the Synthesis Team's reports.

For summaries of climate impacts organized by state, see also the US Environmental Protection Agency's State Impacts site.  See also:


The US National Assessment of the Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change was published in 2000 by the US Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). For information from more recent assessments from the USGCRP, see the National Climate Assessment section of ClimateImpacts.org.